The Application Process: Level 2 (Written Exam)

We are detailing the ICAPGen℠ accreditation process in a series of posts, and today we take a look at Level 2’s written exam.  Previous posts have covered Level 1: The Four-Generation Project and Level 1:  Genealogical Research Experience.  For the complete guide to the application process, Levels 1-4, you can view and download a PDF of the Guide to Applying for an Accredited Genealogist® Credential from the ICAPGen website.  If you still have questions regarding the accreditation process we would love to hear from you, so feel free to contact us.

OVERVIEW

When you have achieved Level 1 recognition, you may take up to three years to apply for the next level of testing.

The written exam is given in two parts: Level 2 and Level 3. One Saturday a quarter has been scheduled for the written exams. A person may take one level exam (Example: either Level 2 or Level 3 or retake of Level 2 or retake of Level 3) during this scheduled test day. After Level 2 is passed those wishing to test sooner than the next quarterly scheduled test day may request “Custom Onsite Testing,” Additional charges apply. See Fee Schedule for details.

The Level 2 exam lasts over four hours, including breaks. You will be allowed to use a facility computer for research and a separate computer for testing. All files that you create will be deleted from the testing computer at the end of that test section. The exams are open book (this includes the Internet).

You will attain Level 2 status by achieving a score of 90% or better on sections 1-4 of the written exam. The Level 2 exam includes the following sections.

GENERAL KNOWLEDGE

You will be tested on your general knowledge of facts pertaining to the history, geography, research methodologies, and records of your region. You may be questioned about historical events that affect research in your region or be asked about types of records available in your region – their content, availability, and coverage.

Preparation Tip: The FamilySearch Family History Research Wiki also provides a list of handwriting resources and other online links for understanding early handwriting for various languages to help you prepare for this portion of the test.

HANDWRITING

You will be tested on your ability to read a genealogical document (or documents) relative to the geographic area and time period of your area of specialty. Be prepared to transcribe and answer questions about a handwritten document from an early time period from the chosen testing region.

If you are accrediting in a region with a language other than your native language, you will be expected to accurately translate documents of genealogical significance written in that language. Use the Language Ability Table to help you rate your own abilities in dealing with foreign-language issues and to see if you are ready to take this portion of the exam.

Preparation Tip: The FamilySearch Family History Research Wiki also provides a list of handwriting resources and other online links for understanding early handwriting for various languages to help you prepare for this portion of the test.

DOCUMENT RECOGNITION

Potential clients might provide documents with insufficient citations, or no citations at all. You will be tested on your ability to identify important types of documents and reference sources for your area of specialty. Be familiar with a variety of documents covering a range of years for your chosen region.

Preparation Tip: For suggestions of genealogical record types, see the “Important Record Type List” for your chosen region shown in tables available from “Resources, Record Types, and Strategies” on our website.

INTERNET SOURCES AND ELECTRONIC DATABASES

You will be tested on your knowledge of the content of Internet sources and electronic databases created by non-profit groups and commercial organizations relating to your geographical area.

Preparation Tip: The FamilySearch Family History Research Wiki offers many suggestions of Internet sources and collections for worldwide locations

QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE

The test is open book, meaning you can consult Internet resources, reference books and personal note files for the written portion of the exam. These files will be used for quick reference as there will not be enough time during the exam to consult the original references.  We encourage you to develop your own quick reference guide to use during the exam.


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